Tag: insurance adjuster

How to Get Your Car Repaired After A Car Accident

How to Get Your Car Repaired After A Car Accident

The impact of a collision can seriously damage both cars involved in the crash. Depending on the extent of the damage, the repairs can cost hundreds or even thousands of dollars. But fortunately, if the other driver caused the car accident, it is their insurance company that will have to pay for your repairs. Here’s how to get your car repaired after a car accident:

Contact the At-Fault Driver’s Insurance Company

If the accident was clearly caused by the other driver, you will need to get in touch with their insurance company as soon as possible. The at-fault party’s insurance company must repair your car so that it is in the same condition it was in prior to the accident. Once they are notified of the accident, the insurance company will ask that you take the car to a repair shop to obtain an estimate for the repairs that need to be made on the vehicle.

Visit A Repair Shop

Insurance companies typically have contracts with repair shops in the community. The contracted shops provide better rates for insurance companies since they account for a significant portion of each shop’s business. But, these are only suggestions, so it’s important to remember that you can obtain an estimate wherever you’d like.

Submit the Estimate to the Insurance Company

Next, the estimate will need to be sent to the insurance adjuster who is assigned to your case. At this point, the insurance adjuster may review and immediately approve the estimate. But unfortunately, the insurance adjuster often finds something that he does not agree with on the estimate. For example, the insurance adjuster may think that a part can be repaired instead of completely replaced. If this happens, the insurance adjuster and repair shop can negotiate until they reach an agreement.

Get the Repairs

Once the estimate has been approved, it’s your responsibility to schedule an appointment at the repair shop and get your car fixed. Be sure to ask the insurance adjuster about whether or not they cover the costs of a rental car that you can use while your car is being fixed. Many insurance companies offer this coverage, which makes it easier to carry on with your life while your car is being repaired.

If you have been involved in a car accident, seek legal representation from the personal injury attorneys at Reisch Law Firm. Let our team fight for the compensation that you deserve for your injuries and property damage. Schedule a free consultation today by calling 303-291-0555 or filling out this online form.

What is an Independent Medical Exam?

What is an Independent Medical Exam?

Personal injury victims are often asked to take an independent medical exam by the at-fault party’s insurance company. Before agreeing to an independent medical exam, it’s important to understand what to expect and why it’s required. Here’s everything that you need to know about independent medical exams in personal injury cases:

What is an Independent Medical Exam?

The insurance adjuster who is assigned to your case will want to verify your injuries before making a settlement offer. To do this, the insurance adjuster will typically ask that you agree to an independent medical exam. This is a medical examination that is supposed to be performed by an independent physician. However, in many cases, the physician that is chosen for the exam is one that has a relationship with the insurance company.

The purpose of the exam is to determine whether the victim’s injuries truly exist, and if they do, that they are as serious as the victim is claiming. The physician will also examine the victim to determine if the injuries could have been caused by something besides the accident caused by the insurance company’s policyholder.

How to Prepare For the Exam

Do not agree to an independent medical exam before speaking to an attorney. Your attorney will be able to tell you whether or not the exam is necessary. If it is, the attorney can prepare you for the exam by going over some basic rules. For example, it’s important to be honest when answering questions during the examination. Do not exaggerate your injuries or lie about the symptoms you experienced and the treatment that you received. If you are dishonest, this could affect your ability to recover compensation from the insurance company.

What to Expect After the Exam

After the exam, the physician will prepare a report that summarizes his findings and send it to the insurance company. The report will include the doctor’s opinion on a number of matters, including the severity of your injuries, the appropriateness of your treatment, and how the injuries have affected your life. The insurance company will then use the information in this report to determine how much they are willing to offer you.

If you have been injured, don’t hesitate to contact Reisch Law Firm. Our personal injury attorneys will handle the negotiations with the insurance company so you focus solely on recovering from your injuries. Schedule a free consultation today by calling 303-291-0555 or filling out this online form.

Should You See A Chiropractor After A Car Accident?

Should You See A Chiropractor After A Car Accident?

Many people who are involved in car accidents suffer from back, neck, and shoulder pain following the crash. Physicians can treat these injuries, but chiropractors are known for specifically treating soft tissue injuries located in these areas of the body. So, if you suffer these injuries, should you see a regular physician or a chiropractor after a car accident? Many car accident victims end up seeing both a physician and a chiropractor during their recovery, but it’s best to see a physician first. Here’s why:

Get A Professional Opinion

It may be obvious that you have suffered some sort of neck, back, or shoulder injury based on the symptoms that you are experiencing. But, it’s best not to diagnose your own injuries in case you’re wrong. Go to a physician as soon as possible after the accident so you can be examined by a medical professional.

Remember, chiropractors do not go through the same training that physicians do, so they will not be able to offer the same level of care. If you go to a chiropractor first, he may not be able to identify other injuries that you have suffered in the accident.

The Value of Your Personal Injury Claim

The at-fault party’s insurance company will need to see copies of your medical records in order to calculate the value of your claim. If the insurance adjuster sees that you solely went to a chiropractor after the accident, this could affect the value of your claim.

Many insurance adjusters favor treatment provided by physicians instead of chiropractors. If you only went to a chiropractor, the insurance adjuster may assume that the injury is not as severe as you are claiming. As a result, the insurance adjuster may lower the value of your claim simply because you chose a chiropractor instead of a physician.

To avoid this problem, it’s best to go to a chiropractor only if it is recommended by a doctor. Be sure to ask your doctor for recommendations so you can make sure that you go to a highly respected chiropractor in the area. Doing this will ensure that your visits to the chiropractor will not impact your ability to recover compensation.

If you have been injured in a car accident, seek medical attention first, then get in touch with a personal injury attorney. The personal injury attorneys at Reisch Law Firm will handle the negotiations with the insurance adjuster so you can focus solely on recovering. Schedule a free consultation today by calling 303-291-0555 or filling out this online form.

How to Handle the First Call With An Insurance Adjuster

How to Handle the First Call With An Insurance Adjuster

Have you been injured in a car accident? If so, expect to receive a phone call from an insurance adjuster at the at-fault party’s insurance company. Insurance adjusters typically make the initial phone call shortly after they are notified of the accident, so it’s possible that you will still be in pain or a state of shock when your phone rings. But, it’s important to pull yourself together so you don’t make any crucial mistakes during this call that could affect the outcome of your case. Here’s how to handle the first call with an insurance adjuster:

Do Not Give Detailed Personal Information

The insurance adjuster will attempt to get as much personal information as possible from you during this call. There’s no reason to provide him with any personal information besides your legal name, address, and phone number. If he asks about your work history, income, or family, politely decline to answer the question.

Avoid Discussing Your Injuries

Do not go into detail about the injuries that you sustained in the accident or comment on the level of pain you are experiencing. This information can be taken out of context and used against you later on in the case. Instead, make it clear that you are seeking medical attention from a doctor and will provide the insurance company with more information when it is available. Do not tell the insurance adjuster which doctors you have seen or if you have been treated for any injury so far.

Don’t Settle

Sometimes, an insurance adjuster will make an offer during the first call. Do not accept this settlement—or any settlement—until you have talked to an attorney. There is no way for you to know the extent of your injuries immediately after an accident, so it’s impossible to calculate the value of your claim at this point. The insurance adjuster is hoping that you will settle for a small amount of money before you find out that your claim is worth much more. Don’t make this mistake—always turn down settlements that are offered during this first call.

Say No to Recorded Statements

An insurance adjuster may ask you to give a recorded statement about the accident, but this is not a good idea. Politely tell the insurance adjuster that you are not interested in providing a recorded statement and will provide a written statement at a later date.

Dealing with an insurance company can be tricky, and if you make a mistake, it could affect the outcome of your case. To protect your best interests, let a personal injury attorney at Reisch Law Firm communicate with the insurance adjuster on your behalf. Schedule a free consultation today by calling 303-291-0555 or filling out this online form.

How An Insurance Adjuster Calculates the Value of Your Personal Injury Claim

How An Insurance Adjuster Calculates the Value of Your Personal Injury Claim

An insurance adjuster is an employee of the insurance company who is assigned to your case to gather evidence, calculate the value of your claim, and negotiate a settlement with you. It’s important to understand how insurance adjusters work so you know what to expect, especially when it comes to the valuation of your claim. Here’s how an insurance adjuster calculates the value of your personal injury claim:

Calculates the Total Medical Expenses

First, the insurance adjuster will add up the medical expenses you have incurred as a result of your injuries. However, during this calculation, the insurance adjuster may decide that some medical expenses should not be included. These are known as “soft” medical expenses, and they can include bills from chiropractors, physical therapists, and other healthcare providers that are not physicians.

Factor in Pain and Suffering

The next step is to factor in the pain and suffering that you have experienced since sustaining your injuries. If the insurance adjuster believes your injuries are minor, he will multiply your total medical expenses by 1.5 or 2. When the injuries are more severe, the insurance adjuster typically goes up to 5, however he can go as high as 10. This number will then be added to the total medical expenses.

Lost Income

Then, the insurance adjuster will need to review the evidence you have submitted that shows the amount of income you have lost due to your injuries. The insurance adjuster will arrive at an amount after reviewing your evidence, and then add this figure to the previous total.

Comparative Negligence Deductions

Colorado is a modified comparative negligence state, which means you can still recover compensation even if you are partly at fault for the accident. How does it work? The insurance adjuster will carefully review the case to determine the role that both parties played in the accident. If the insurance adjuster believes you are 25% at fault and the other party was 75% at fault, he will reduce the value of your claim by 25%.

The number that the insurance adjuster arrives at after following these steps may be the first offer that he extends to you during negotiations. But, the insurance adjuster often underestimates the value of your claim in an attempt to get you to settle for less than you deserve.

If you have been injured, never accept an offer from an insurance company without consulting with an attorney first. The personal injury attorneys at Reisch Law Firm will help you calculate the actual value of your claim so you don’t make the mistake of accepting an offer that is lower than what you deserve. Schedule a free consultation by calling 303-291-0555 or filling out this online form.

How to Deal With an Insurance Adjuster After a Car Accident

How to Deal With an Insurance Adjuster After a Car Accident

If you have been injured in a car accident, one of the first things that a personal injury attorney will tell you is that you shouldn’t speak to the insurance adjuster assigned to your case. Why? Your attorney will know how to deal with an insurance adjuster, so it’s best that you leave this task up to him instead of handling it on your own and potentially making a mistake that could affect your claim.

What an Insurance Adjuster Does After the Accident

To understand why you should let an attorney handle the insurance company, it’s important to learn about what the insurance adjuster does. The insurance company will assign an adjuster to your case as soon as they are notified about the accident. The adjuster is given the task of researching the accident to determine exactly what happened, who is at fault, and the value of the claim.

To investigate the accident, the insurance adjuster will most likely reach out to you and ask that you provide a statement. He may ask both parties to submit evidence of injuries and property damage as well. After he has gathered all of the evidence related to the accident, he will determine the value of your claim and then begin the process of negotiating a settlement.

Why You Shouldn’t Speak to an Insurance Adjuster

Giving a statement to an insurance adjuster may seem innocent enough, but you should never do this without talking to an attorney. Why? Any statement that you make can be taken out of context and used to prove that you were partially or completely at fault for the accident. Your words could also be used to prove that you are not suffering from serious injuries, and therefore should not receive compensation. Even answering the question, “How are you?” with “I’m ok,” could be twisted around by the insurance adjuster and reported as “The victim says she is ok.”

The adjuster may also contact you immediately after the accident and offer you a settlement. There’s no way for you to know the extent of your injuries or property damage shortly after an accident, so it’s never wise to accept this deal. This is just another tactic that insurance companies use to try to avoid paying you the compensation that you deserve.

Remember, the insurance adjuster does not work for you, he works for the insurance company. Insurance companies are only concerned with reducing risk and maximizing profit, so you shouldn’t expect them to put your needs first.

If you have been injured in a car accident, let an experienced personal injury attorney at Reisch Law Firm handle the insurance adjuster. Our attorneys will ensure that you do not fall for any of the insurance adjuster’s tricks so you can receive the compensation that you deserve. Schedule a consultation with us today by calling 303-291-0555 or filling out this online form.